Thermoset Technology – Stronger & Lighter Than Steel

Stronger and lighter than steel, Thermoset technology may be the future of architecture. According to an article by Arch Daily, this revolutionary material solves many common structural and construction problems while simultaneously allowing architects a new freedom with their designs.

Originally created as aerospace technology, advanced fiber-reinforced materials are now being used in the manufacturing of new buildings, opening new and exciting design possibilities for architects.

Makers of these materials can manufacture building components off-site, and the light-weight material is then shipped to the construction site where it can be put together quickly and easily by smaller crews of contractors, thus cutting down on construction costs.

Additionally, the strength of Thermoset materials far out-weighs steel, by nearly 6 times. This strength has immense applications for building considerations, allowing for more structural freedom while still providing protection from environmental hazards like earthquakes.

Another benefit is that these materials can be molded into literally any shape, giving architects open concept freedom when it comes to building design--fantastic shapes can be brought to life on a huge scale while still maintaining structural integrity. The possibilities are quite literally endless.


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Pepperdine’s Architecture And Fire Safety

Pepperdine has developed a shelter-in-place policy with close collaboration with the Los Angeles County Fire Department that allows students to remain on campus for a range of disasters, including the Woolsey Fire that hit California last fall.

The policy was developed after a close encounter with a wild fire in 1985 and has been implemented for every fire since 1993. Another key reason that Pepperdine took more preventative measures was how close they are to the Pacific Coast Highway. If Malibu residents are ordered an evacuation, gridlock becomes a big issue especially since a lot of students may not have vehicles.

Pepperdine’s best defense against wild fires is the campus design itself. Its architect was William Pereira, who was based in Los Angeles. Pereira was commissioned to create a master plan for Malibu in 1965, but the plan was never made public. Instead he was able revisit his ideas with Pepperdine years later when they gave him the opportunity.

Curbed describes the campus as “Mediterranean modern: angular cast-concrete volumes situated around wide concrete plazas with spectacular ocean vistas.” The campus structures make good use of fire-resistant decorative materials like glass and ceramic. Even the shape of the buildings with steep Spanish-tile rooflines helps ensure that fire won’t get trapped beneath the eaves. Of Pepperdine’s 830 acres—500 acres have no structure. Pereira’s vision for the campus included dense clustering of buildings to maintain open spaces. He also preserved a meadow and designed a water infrastructure to recycle waste water and store it on site.


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Mercedes-Benz Stadium Lead By LEED Example

The Mercedes-Benz Stadium, home of the Atlanta Falcons and United FC, is part of the moving trend of stadiums focusing their operations on greener sustainability and energy. The stadium scored a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) of 88 out of a potential 110 and earned a Platinum certification.

LEED is the most widely used green building rating system and helps provide a framework for efficient green buildings. They are recognized globally for sustainability achievement.  Points are awarded to builders for including efficient features like lighting and water fixtures, locating the structure near public transportation, and using locally sourced and recycled materials.

The Mercedes-Benz stadium holds up to 680,000 gallons of rainwater collected by a 120 foot-long cistern. The runoff is used to irrigate the building’s vegetation and helps reduce flooding of a nearby low-lying West End neighborhood. Scott Jenkins, general manager for the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, says “It’s a community play as much as an environmental play, to do our part around issues in the neighborhood. If you looked at the return on investment for the water, it will take a long time to pay off. But some of this is good for business and some are good for the community.”

More and more sports stadiums and arenas are installing solar panels, LED lighting and scoreboards, as well as energy efficient air-conditioning. Today’s sports stadiums are shining a light on the complex and critical issues of climate change. Stadiums and arenas have physical and cultural prominence and help fans gain exposure to green initiatives like LED lighting or low-flush toilets.


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