AIA’s Tips for Career Resilience

Despite the economic uncertainty facing the world right now, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) wants to help all architecture professionals keep their careers going strong. They recently hosted a webinar where they spoke to four panelists who lived and worked through the last Great Recession. Below are the highlights from their advice on how to have career resilience during difficult times.

Utilize Your Network

Staying connected with previous professors, classmates, or co-workers is a great way to find new opportunities. Here are three simple tips for using your network:

  • Be upfront when looking for a new job, and give back by helping others in their search once you find a position.
  • Reach out to professors, even if you weren’t close. Remember: your school wants you to succeed.
  • Reach out to career services, alumni networks, and local AIA chapters to ask for help, request a mentor, or re-engage when you need encouragement.

Get Involved

  • Use design competitions and events to supplement your portfolio with new building typologies to broaden your experience.
  • Volunteer with AIA, Open Architecture Collaborative, USGBC, Urban Land Institute, and others to extend your network within the profession and to stay engaged if you’re working in a different field.
  • Keep pursuing your license to maximize your skills and marketability.*

*Architects Training Institute consistently adds new online continuing education courses starting at $29

Think Outside the Biz

  • Expand your search to different sectors, different size firms, and new locations. Or consider architecture-adjacent positions such as real estate or facility management.
  • Panelists who accepted positions like these during their job search said they gained useful experience that gave them an advantage in future interviews.

Whether you’re a recent graduate or experienced professional, always remember you have resources and a support system that will help you through economic hardship.


DO YOU NEED STATE APPROVED CONTINUING EDUCATION?

Looking Forward: Architecture in a Post COVID-19 World

In an effort to give you a break from the negative news cycle, we want to look forward toward the future and the many possibilities it brings for architects.

In recent weeks, the Moving Forward Act has made its way through Congress. Late last month, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) announced their support of the bill. AIA President Jane Frederick said “Passing the Moving Forward Act is a necessary next step that we must take as a nation in order to deliver the opportunities that American workers—including architects—desperately need.”

The proposal allocates billions of dollars for infrastructure improvements such as:

  • The Reopen and Rebuild America’s Schools Act, which would provide funding for improvements to school infrastructure, especially those in high-poverty areas, and upgrading child-care facilities.
  • Encourage the rehabilitation of historic buildings through the temporary increase of the Historic Tax Credit
  • Improve affordable housing infrastructure by creating and preserving 1.8 million affordable homes
  • Establish a new Neighborhood Investment tax credit that would subsidize certain development costs to encourage the rehabilitation of vacant homes or construction of new homes in distressed areas

As architects, you’re responsible for much more than just designing safe and beautiful structures; your work can make a positive difference in communities around the country. The schools you help build or renovate (especially in lower income areas) bring opportunities for success that weren’t possible before. Working to increase affordable housing works toward lowering homeless rates and gives families a sense of security.

When it comes time to rebuild the nation (financially and literally), we are proud to help architects like you make positive changes in your local community.


Is it almost time to renew your license?

The following states have continuing education deadlines approaching:

7/31/20 - WI

8/31/20 - MA

10/31/20 - MI

11/31/20 - IL

12/31/20 - AL, AR, DE, FL, KY, LA, MO, MT, NC, NE (L-Z), NM, NV, OH, OR, TX, UT, WV, WY

MONTHLY - ID, MD, NH, NY, SD, TN, VA, WA


DO YOU NEED STATE APPROVED CONTINUING EDUCATION?

Massachusetts Architect License Renewal – COVID-19 Update & FAQ’s

Normally, Massachusetts architects must renew their licenses annually by August 31st. But, with Massachusetts still in a state of emergency due to COVID-19, that deadline is extended to 90 days after the state of emergency is lifted. No matter the deadline, here are answers to your frequently asked questions about architect license renewal in your state.


When does my Massachusetts architect license expire?

Licenses expire on August 31st every year

In March 2020, Governor Charlie Baker signed an executive order that changed the renewal deadline. With Massachusetts still in a state of emergency due to COVID-19, the new deadline is extended to 90 days after the state of emergency is lifted.

How do I renew my Massachusetts architect license?

The state sends renewal notices prior to expiration. Your license renewal form will have a check-off required which certifies that the renewing architect has met the CE requirements. A random audit will be performed after the renewals are received.

Do I need to complete continuing education requirements for my AIA membership?

Yes, as an Architect member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), 18 learning unit hours are required per calendar-year for membership renewal. Of these 18 hours, at least 12 hours must be in subjects designated as Health, Safety, and Welfare (HSW).

Are AIA approved classes accepted to renew my Massachusetts architect license?

Yes.

What are the Massachusetts architect continuing education requirements?

Massachusetts architects must complete:

  • Total State Hours: 12 HSW Hours
  • Total AIA Membership Hours*: 18 Annually, including 12 HSW

*Your AIA hours also fulfill your state requirements

I'm an AIA member, do I need to complete continuing education requirements for my AIA membership?

Yes, as an Architect member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), 18 learning unit hours are required per calendar-year for membership renewal. Of these 18 hours, at least 12 hours must be in subjects designated as Health, Safety, and Welfare (HSW).

I have extra continuing education hours, can I apply them to the next renewal cycle?

No, learning units must be completed in their respective cycle.

Who notifies Massachusetts of my architect continuing education completion?

It is the licensee’s responsibility to notify the state. You must keep your records for at least two (2) years. Random audits are conducted after renewal application is received. Architects Training Institute will store your records for 6-years at no extra cost.

How do I contact the Massachusetts Architectural Board with further questions?

Massachusetts Board of Registration of Architects

1000 Washington Street, 7th Floor
Boston, Massachusetts 02118-6100
Phone: 617-701-8690
Fax: 617-727-9932


DO YOU NEED STATE APPROVED CONTINUING EDUCATION?

Architects Spring into Action to Build Emergency Structures During Global Pandemic

As the coronavirus continues to spread throughout the world, hospitals are running short on space. Now, governments and communities are tasking architects and builders to help retrofit and build new spaces to house patients.

The pandemic hit especially hard in Italy, with hundreds of thousands of cases reported. Architect Carlo Ratti has come up with what he calls CURA: Connected Units for Respiratory Ailments. The pods are intensive care units housed in old shipping containers.

In a press release, Ratti’s firm says “each unit works autonomously and can be shipped anywhere. Individual pods are connected by an inflatable structure to create multiple modular configurations (from 4 beds to over 40), which can be deployed in just a few hours.”

Thanks to negative pressure, CURA is compact and is hosted within a 20-foot intermodal container with biocontainment.

In the United States, Michigan has become an epicenter of the virus, and now, one Northern Michigan builder is on a mission to provide vital infrastructure for their community.

Britten Woodworks is building portable hand-washing stations and sanitizing stands for medical centers and other needs. On the company’s website, they say their design is compact, portable, durable and can be built and delivered in a week. Their sister company, Britten, has also rolled out cough guards for use at reception areas.

In the Detroit area, hospitals are close to running out of space. Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer has authorized the use of a famous convention center, TCF Center, to be retrofitted to hold extra hospital beds.

In Northern Michigan, hospital representatives from Munson Healthcare say they are also analyzing spaces that could be used to hold extra patients if they were to run out of room in their facilities.


DO YOU NEED STATE APPROVED CONTINUING EDUCATION?