Reciprocal Package 32-Hour

Fulfills Requirements for 50 States
32 Credit Hours

$299.00

Description

Architects 32 Hour Complete Renewal Package – All 50 States

Meets ONLINE state continuing education requirements.  Also includes a 2-hour ethics course to meet Minnesota and Nebraska Requirements

Nebraska requires architects to take part of their required hours in person. Check your state page for details.

This 32-hour package contains:

Course #1 – (5 hour Online Narrated) CA Building Code Division 2: Accessibility | AIABLTI331.20 CA ADA COURSE
Course #2 – (3 hour Online Narrated) Successful Building Design AIABLTI340.5
Course #3 – (3 hour Online Narrated) Successful Code Analysis: Occupancy Group B | #AIABLTI458
Course #4 – (3 hour Online Narrated) Getting Decked: And Choosing How That Happens | #AIABLTI451
Course #5 — (4 hour Online Narrated) Aging in Place – Eliminating Pitfalls | # AIABLTI459
Course #6 — (4 hour Online Narrated) Acoustical Design in Modern Architecture AIABLTI342
Course #7 — (3 hour Online Narrated) Danger in the Damp – Dealing with Mold | #AIABLTI454
Course #8 — (3 hour Online Narrated) Drier By Design – Designing to Keep Water Out | #AIABLTI453
Course #9 — (2 hour Online Narrated) Minnesota and Nebraska Required Ethics | #AIABLTI456
Course #10 – (1 hour Online Narrated) Gable End Anchoring & Framing in High Velocity Hurricane Zones Advanced Internet | #AIABLTI315.21
Course #11 – (1 hour Online Narrated) Thermal & Moisture Protection: Keeping the Weather Out FL ADV Internet Module | #AIABLTI516.21
Course #12 – (1 hour Bonus Narrated) Understanding and Preventing Sexual Harassment | #AIABLTI510.20

 

 

Credit(s) earned on completion of this course will be reported to AIA CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members will be available to print upon completion of this course. This course is registered with AIA CES for continuing professional education.

California Required Building Code: Division 2: Accessibility

Instructor: Rodger B. Peck

(If you are being audited by the Board, please print out this section It contains the information needed for the continuing education audit.)

Rodger has over 25 years experience building, teaching and consulting with individuals in the construction industry. He has conducted extensive research and study in developing, compiling and writing Americans with Disabilities Act courses for architects, engineers, and commercial and residential builders. Rodger holds a vast amount of certifications and approvals, both State specific and nationally:

  • Michigan Residential Builders License #2101137251
  • American Institute of Architect (AIA) approved instructor
  • International Distance Education Certified (IDECC) Qualified #67861
  • Lead Paint Safety (RRP) Certified Instructor through the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
  • Alabama Licensing Board approved instructor
  • Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) approved instructor
  • Georgia Board for Residential and General Contractors (BRGC) approved instructor
  • Massachusetts Department of Public Safety (DPS) approved instructor
  • Michigan Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) approved instructor
  • Minnesota Department of Licensing and Industry (DLI) approved instructor
  • Oregon Construction Contractor Board (CCB) approved instructor
  • Utah Department of Occupational and Professional Licensing (DOPL) approved instructor
  • Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation (DPOR) approved instructor

The ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life — to enjoy employment opportunities, to purchase goods and services, and to participate in State and local government programs and services. The standards set minimum requirements – both scoping and technical – for newly designed and constructed, or altered state and local government facilities, public accommodations, and commercial facilities to be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

This five hour audio course covers the second chapter of the ADA Standards for Accessible Design and includes the California modifications found in Division 2, Chapter 11B of the California Building Code including the most recent changes. While an individual designer may be able to use the ADA for personal or generic residential design, the California code should be used by registered design professionals and enforcement officials and applied when the project is for public use within the state of California. In this video course, the material is presented by simple narration and power point video presentation, as well as on-site, real-world video examples in various accessible buildings, used by both the public and private businesses.

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize how the overall philosophy of the Americans with Disabilities Act can, and does create an environment of opportunity and non-discrimination.
  • Be able recognize what facilities can, and should comply with Chapter 11B Accessibility of the California Building Code.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on accessibility standards for the construction of either a public or private building.
  • Summarize the options available to the design or building professional when designing a facility per the requirements of Chapter 11B.

This Course Covers:

  • Application
  • Existing Buildings and Facilities
  • General Exceptions
  • Protruding Objects
  • Operable Parts
  • Accessible Routes: Work areas, Amusement parks, Recreational areas, Entrances, Lifts
  • Accessible Means of Egress
  • Parking Spaces
  • Passenger Loading Zones and Bus Stops
  • Stairways
  • Drinking Fountains
  • Kitchens, Kitchenettes, and Sinks
  • Toilet Facilities and Bathing Facilities
  • Washing Machines and Clothes Dryers
  • Fire Alarm Systems
  • Signs
  • Telephones
  • Transportation Facilities
  • Assistive Listening Systems
  • Automatic Teller Machines and Fare Machines
  • Assembly Areas
  • Dressing, Fitting, and Locker Rooms
  • Medical Care and Long-term Care Facilities
  • Transient Lodging Guest Rooms
  • Storage
  • Dining Surfaces and Work Surfaces
  • Sales and Service
  • Depositories, Vending Machines, Change Machines, Mail Boxes and Fuel Dispensers
  • Windows
  • Two-Way Communication Systems
  • Judicial Facilities
  • Detention Facilities and Correctional Facilities
  • Residential Facilities
  • Recreational Boating and Golf Facilities
  • Exercise Machines and Equipment
  • Play Areas
  • Saunas and Steam Rooms
  • Swimming Pools, Wading Pools and Spas
  • Shooting Facilities with Firing Positions


Successful Building Design

Instructor:  Wayde Hoppe

Developers of commercial, industrial and institutional buildings are driven by return on investment. Today’s building owners are savvy and they seek to balance the initial cost with the payback. Functionality, aesthetics, and methods of code compliance are each guided by financial investment and return. In this course, you will learn, from the foundation to the roof, from the appearance to the operation, from construction to maintenance, tried and proven methods for analyzing design decisions that will lead you to a greater reputation as a designer.

Most architects are familiar with the design process and are usually comfortable with at least one or more of the steps. However, what we learn in school needs to be coupled with the requirements of today’s many codes and regulations, the changes in material development, our client’s demand for a return on investment and the realities of construction budgets.

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Be able to integrate design concepts with current codes and regulations.
  • Translate the intentions and goals of the customer into a safe and cost-effective project.
  • Utilize current materials and goods to ensure proper construction practices.
  • Recognize the importance of meeting the client’s demand for return on investment.

This Course Covers:

  • Defining the Building Type & Ideal Building size
  • Initial Construction Budget
  • Code Analysis
  • Site Evaluation
  • Selecting Consultants
  • Defining the Structural System
  • Selecting the Best Foundation System
  • Creating an Envelope
  • Laying out the Floor Plate
  • HVAC, Plumbing & Electrical Systems
  • Selecting Your Materials
  • Specialty Materials & Design Services

 


Successful Code Analysis:  Occupancy Group B

Instructor:  Wayde Hoppe

Most colleges spend very little time giving instruction to designers on how to comply with the building code. This may be because there used to be so many different types of building codes that it was impractical to offer instruction on every one of them. However, our country is moving closer to a nationwide standard. As we do, it is useful to know the basics on how to navigate your way through the building code. In this lesson we will look at the steps necessary to review a project against the building code, specifically looking at chapters 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9.

These chapters will allow us to identify the building use, the building construction type, the requirements for sprinkling, the requirements for frontage on clear area around the building, the height of the building and whether the building will be protected or not. We will review the requirements of chapters 3, 5, 6, 7 and 9 and we will discuss what options are available for a designer in his attempt to bring the desires of his client together with the limitations of the code. In order to get a clear understanding of this process, we will examine several sample projects. Our projects will all be a business use group. We will cover generic material about the building code and we will explore a specific use group and how the code applies to it.

After completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Specify and identify the building use, the building construction type, the requirements for sprinkling, frontage on clear area around the building, the height of the building and whether the building will be protected or not.
  • Understand and be able to comply with a specific use group and how the code applies to it.
  • Be able to integrate design concepts with current codes and regulations.
  • Translate the goals of the customer into a safe and cost-effective project that accounts for the limitations of the code.


Getting Decked:  And Choosing How That Happens

Instructor:  Paul Spite

Despite our need for shelter from elements, we have always sought opportunity to get back into or close to nature. A large part of our effort to reunite with nature has revolved around creating outdoor spaces adjoining our houses. There, we can get outside to enjoy favorable climate conditions, at whatever time we choose.

These outdoor spaces go by many names and have manifested as lanais, porches, screened enclosures, patios, etc. The most common outdoor spaces, constructed and attached to homes in western cultures, are outdoor decks, balconies and patios. For the purposes of this course, we will explore options available to build decks, balconies, and structures that are usually supported at some point above grade.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • The evolving use of different materials to construct safe and usable outdoor surfaces
  • Strengths and weaknesses of each available outdoor surface option
  • New surfacing options that have been developed to overcome decking material limitations
  • How surfacing materials are being combined to minimize weaknesses and maximize strengths
  • Decking / Balconies made of wood, man-made materials, aluminum, concrete and Porcelain?


Aging in Place – Eliminating Pitfalls

Instructor: Paul Spite

In millions of homes across our country, and in the homes of people we love, existing residences are slowly but surely becoming prisons for their occupants. This happens as the aging process inevitably removes our ability to successfully navigate stairs and perform daily tasks required to live and survive independent. Societal options exist to move from private residences into congregate living facilities, where oversight and care are offered at various levels for those facing challenges. But few are interested in thus surrendering their independence. We prefer to just age-in-place.

It is possible to remain at home as physical and / or mental deterioration makes doing so more challenging. Given the amount of research that preceded establishing design standards to accommodate the handicapped, new structures can be designed which are far more user friendly to the elderly. Changes to existing homes can also be made in incremental steps as needs arise, just not as efficiently as doing so from scratch.

The knowledge and technology to enable our elders to stay at home are well established. All that is lacking are finances to do so, the time to do so, the will to do so and wide-spread dissemination of knowledge on how to do so.

The last of those issues is addressed in this work.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • A thorough understanding of physical challenges that make aging-in-place more difficult.
  • An increased awareness of cognitive issues that make aging-in-place more difficult.
  • Resolvable issues faced by the elderly while navigating outside the home.
  • Changes in typical lighting strategies that are beneficial to an aging population.
  • Proper design of exterior amenities to facilitate increased enjoyment of nature by an older population.
  • The impacts of different choices in finishes in reducing dangers faced while aging-in-place.
  • Design choices that make common areas in multi-family housing more user friendly to the aged.
  • Changes in cabinetry needed to accommodate use by the handicapped

This Course Covers:

  • The Scope of This Work
  • Problems to be Expected with Aging
  • Expect Resistance
  • Potential Changes Ahead
  • Outside the Home
  • Common Areas in Multi-Family and Individual Homes
  • Alarms and Alerts
  • HVAC System Concerns
  • Electrical Concerns
  • Other Available Resources


Acoustical Design In Modern Architecture

Course Instructor:  Paul Spite

Unwanted sound impacts and affects inhabitants of our created spaces. If it not already, controlling noise will quickly become a mandated concern for designers. Attesting to increasing regulatory focus on noise, there is a recent proliferation of standards, guidelines, and codes regarding acoustics.

Very soon, many of these guidelines will no longer be mere suggestions. Most concerns covered in these standards can be addressed with a basic understanding on how sound travels and is reflected, blocked, absorbed, or transmitted by materials and assemblies chosen in designing envelopes.

Acoustic design is best addressed in an incremental fashion. This course was written to do just that. Fundamentals are first covered, including basic principles regarding sound, how its energy moves through matter, how its path and intensity can be altered, and how success in the manipulation of sound is measured. Known design strategies are discussed for controlling sound moving; from exterior to interior spaces, from interior spaces to adjacent spaces, within interior spaces, through structural components, and through building systems. Design considerations are outlined for numerous common building functions. Finally, acoustic codes and guidelines in existence now, are listed for consideration.

After completing this course  participants will be able to:

  • Design objectives and recommended best practices for building types where poor acoustics directly impact productivity and health of the users.
  • Determine sources of noise that negatively impact users of built environments, generated both outside and from within buildings, including both air borne and structure borne sounds.
  • Outline basic design practices for effectively controlling; sound transfer between exterior and interior spaces, noise transfer from interior space to adjacent spaces, and the reverberation of sound generated within spaces.
  • Provide an overview of regulations and guidelines that either are, or may become law underscoring a need for competency in acoustic design, before legislatures make designing for noise control mandatory.

This Course Covers:

  • Acoustics in General
  • General Vocabulary Regarding Sound and Nature of Sound
  • Production, Control, sound transmission and Reception
  • Audible Sound Frequencies
  • Effects of Sound on People
  • Principals of Acoustics
  • Sound Behavior Patterns
  • Acoustic Measurements
  • Amplified Sound
  • Design Solutions for Specific Concerns Regardles of Project Type
  • Resisting transmission of noise from the exterior into the interior of a space
  • Resisting horizontal and vertical transmission of noise from space to adjacent space, including structure borne sound
  • Controlling reverberation time of sound generated within a space
  • Masking unwanted noise with sound generating systems
  • Controlling system sounds, especially HVAC noises, that enter a space
  • Design Considerations by Specific Project Type


Danger in the Damp – Dealing with Mold

Instructor:  Paul Spite

Despite our best efforts to keep it out, water has found its way inside the building. This course examines the question of what to do next, since abandoning the building to its eventual collapse is not usually an option.

The material briefly examines design and construction methods of systems designed to withstand water penetration. An understanding of these systems gives us a starting point in finding sources of intrusion, and a starting point for how to best repair them and prevent further damage. Sealing a failed envelope is the first step in remediation. Otherwise, the appearance of mold will likely be the next step in rendering our damaged buildings uninhabitable.

Once the source of the problem has been addressed, steps can be taken to reclaim full use of the built environment. Assessment of moisture damage must be done next to best determine and prioritize steps toward repair or replacement of damaged components. Immediate and critical remedies are examined, as well as those which can be addressed after a couple days have passed. Lastly, any resulting mold growth must be eliminated, and steps taken to prevent its recurrence.

Because of its power and the many ways water finds to enter our buildings, water intrusion with accompanying mold growth is one of the most discouraging building maintenance issues to address. But we have enough accumulated experience from past battles to handle it far better moving forward.

This course is intended to equip others with that knowledge.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Terminology used to discuss how entrapped water creates problems for building users
  • Measures to retard the infiltration of moisture into built environments
  • Where and why mold growth occurs
  • Testing and inspection to find water damage
  • Systems and procedures to inventory moisture damage following intrusion
  • Immediate and secondary actions steps to take following water intrusion
  • Indoor air quality issues and how to identify them
  • How to deal with mold growth, once it is discovered

This course covers:

  • Overview of Moisture Related Problems
  • Moisture Damage to Buildings
  • Before Damage Occurs
  • Solutions to Water Penetration Issues
  • Maintaining Building Systems as Lines of Defense
  • Dealing with Building Damage from Moisture
  • Air Quality Concerns
  • Dealing with Mold in the Airstream


Drier By Design – Designing to Keep Water Out

Instructor:  Paul Spite

With erosion paths cut into solid rock as solid evidence, water in various forms contains immense power to eat away or destroy whatever is in its path. Whether it takes a year, two hundred or ten thousand, without intervention, water can and will destroy our man-made structures. Once a problem develops that opens a pathway for intrusion, one rainy season can render a building unsuitable for human use.

We have the knowledge and tools to combat such destruction of our structures. We implement counterattacks in the design stage, during construction, and afterwards with proactive maintenance, but the battle against water begins in the design phase.

Moisture resistance principles and methods are discussed in a systematic fashion, as in one building system at a time. Fundamentals are first covered, including basic principles of water behavior and the multiple paths it takes while invading buildings. A thorough knowledge of how destruction begins and escalates drives the known design principles and material decisions used to stop such migration. Practical solutions are then discussed in detail.

The discussion is needed. The physical price tag for both our structures and their occupants is too high to allow water free entry into our occupied spaces.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • A basic understanding of how water moves, migrates, and behaves
  • Typical sources of excess moisture in our built environments
  • Proactive prevention of unwanted moisture through planning and design
  • Methods used during construction to prevent the intrusion of water
  • Post-construction prevention of leakage by building envelope inspection
  • Common points of failure through which water can gain entrance
  • Prevention of water intrusion through control of condensation
  • Glossary of Terms Regarding Water Intrusion
  • Water Behavior
  • Moisture Problems
  • Sources of Water
  • Water and Building Components
  • Moisture from Plumbing Leaks, HVAC Systems, Ventilation Systems, and Condensation
  • Tightening the Envelope
  • Vapor and Air Retarders
  • Combatting Negative Air Pressure


Minnesota and Nebraska Required Ethics | AIABLTI456

THIS COURSE MUST BE COMPLETED BY ALL MINNESOTA AND NEBRASKA ARCHITECTS

Instructor:  Joshua Francis 

Having a reputation for straight forward business practices can only help your business.  In the current environment of corporate malfeasance, customers will welcome and value a company that promotes a culture of trust and respect.  What should potential customers know about your company?  Is reliable customer service and forthright dialogue of value to you as an owner? This two hour video course will provide an overview of ethical theory and application that will help you establish and maintain hard earned business relationships.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the fundamental theories of ethics and their respective weaknesses.
  • Describe how to effectively apply a Code of Ethics to the current policies, rules and guidelines governing an organization that will ultimately serve the needs of the customer.
  • Summarize the components of a well designed Code of Conduct, including standards, obligations and consequences for non-compliance.
  • Create a Code of Conduct that embodies the ethics that accurately reflect the company core values and principles.

This Course Covers:

  • Ethics vs. Morals
  • Social Norms
  • Ethics, Values, and Your Business
  • Stakeholders
  • Introduction to Ethical Theory – (Duty, Consequence, and Virtue)
  • Duty Based Ethics
  • Consequence and Virtue Based Ethics
  • Basic Code of Ethics / Code of Conduct
  • Simplified and Comprehensive Code of Ethics


Gable End Anchoring & Framing in High Velocity Hurricane Zones FL ADV Internet Module | AIABLTI315.21

IMPORTANT:  This course applies one credit towards the Florida Building Commission Advanced Credit. Course FBC #817.2. DBPR Approval #0613889. 

Instructor:  J. MacDowell

This one hour internet course is intended to provide a minimum of one hour of instruction of Advanced continuing education for Florida certificate holders and registrants pertaining to Gable End Anchoring and Framing.  Inspection of residential buildings that endured past hurricanes in Florida has shown that one of the most damaged structural components in residential homes is the gable-end wall or the gable-end truss for timber wall or masonry wall constructions.  This course is based on the 2020 Florida Building Code changes that surround the most common causes of gable end failure during high velocity hurricane events.

A ten-question, multiple choice assessment at the end of the course must be completed with a 70% pass rate in order to complete the course and print a certificate of completion.

The objective of this course is to inform building contractors of proven methods of building sustainable roof structures when built in areas subjected to high velocity winds.

This Course Covers:

  • Categories, Regions and Practical Perspective
  • Reinforcing Roof to Wall Connections
  • High-Velocity Hurricane Zone and Construction Details
  • Masonry
  • Steel Joists
  • Gable Endwalls
  • Wood Members
  • Unit Stresses
  • Vertical Framing
  • Horizontal Framing
  • Anchorage
  • Sheathing


Thermal and Moisture Protection:  Keeping the Weather Out FL ADV Internet Module | AIABLTI516.21

IMPORTANT:  This course applies one credit towards the Florida Building Commission Advanced Credit. Course FBC #635.3. DBPR Approval #0613890. 

Instructor:  J. MacDowell

Protecting buildings from the weather and moisture related problems is important for all building professionals. In areas of high rainfall, and in northern climates, it is even more important that designers, builders, and their subcontractors use “Best Practice” procedures to carefully plan and install thermal and weather resistant components. This course, based on the 2020 Florida Building codes, pertains to moisture and weather related problems, and will identify practical solutions based on those requirements.  This internet course is intended to provide a minimum of one hour of continuing education to professionals involved in planning, design and construction of structures susceptible to moisture related issues.

METHOD OF PRESENTATION: This distance learning course is formatted specifically for internet delivery. Course presentation will require student participation through an assessment. This method of course presentation assures that student will have direct control of course delivery.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the key elements (either natural or mechanical) of a properly ventilated structure.
  • List and describe at least three specific installation techniques and/or materials that contribute to a properly constructed roof system.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on “best practices” for the construction of buildings in areas with  high humidity.
  • Identify and implement proven methods that will effectively divert moisture from the foundation of a structure.

This Course Covers:

  • Keeping the Weather Out
  • Foundations
  • House Wrap and Underlayment
  • Corrosion and Decay Resistance
  • The Building Frame
  • Siding
  • Windows and Doors
  • Roofs
  • Ventilation

 


Sexual Harassment Training

Instructor: J. MacDowell

This one-hour course will provide learners with an understanding of sexual harassment, forms of harassment, reporting procedures for harassment, and employer responsibility and liability in the prevention of sexual harassment. Extensive examples, scenarios, and case studies are included for real-world applications.

You will learn to:

  • Recognize sexual harassment forms and types
  • Understand reporting procedures for harassment
  • Acquire knowledge of whistle blower protections
  • Apply class concepts to scenarios and examples

 


Credit(s) earned on completion of this course will be reported to AIA CES for AIA members.  Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members are available to print upon completion of the course.

This course is registered with AIA CES for continuing professional education.  As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA or any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product.


If you have any questions please call us at 1-800-727-7104 | Monday-Friday | 8am-8pm
Or send an email to info@onlinecti.com. Emails will be responded to within one business day.

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