ICC 6 Credit Bundle

Fulfills 6 ICC Credits for 11+ Certifications
6 ICC Credits

$499.00

Description

This 6 Credit package contains:

Course #1 – (7 hour Audio Course) Manage Your Way to Big Profits | #AIABLTI334.21
Course #2 – (7 hour Video Course) 2010 ADA Standards: Key Features and Elements | #AIABLTI325.20
Course #3 – (6 hour Video Course) Lead Paint Awareness | #AIABLTI333.21
Course #4 – (6 hour Video Course) 2010 ADA Standards: Real World Application Course | #AIABLTI312.24
Course #5 – (3 hour Audio Course) Lean on Me – Choosing Railings Carefully | #AIABLTI457.22
Course #6– (3 hour Audio Course) Getting Decked: And Choosing How That Happens | #AIABLTI451
Course #7 – (3 hour Audio Course) Successful Site Design | #AIABLTI335.22
Course #8 – (3 hour Audio Course) Danger in the Damp – Dealing with Mold | #AIABLTI454.22
Course #9 – (3 hour Audio Course) Successful Building Design | #AIABLTI340.5
Course #10 – (3 hour Audio Course) Successful Renovations and Additions | #AIABLTI341.5 /0.3 ICC CEU
Course #11 – (3 hour Video Course) 2010 ADA Standards: Interior Elements | #AIABLTI314.20
Course #12 – (3 hour Video Course) 2010 ADA Standards: Exterior Building Blocks | #AIABLTI313.20
Course #13 – (3 hour Audio Course) Construction Documents For Successful Projects | #AIABLTI450.24
Course #14 – (2 hour Audio Course) Successful Use of Pre-Engineered Metal Buildings | #AIABLTI452
Course #15 – (2 hour Audio Course) ADA Paths – Part 1 No One Left Behind | #AIABLTI511.23
Course #16 – (2 hour Audio Course) ADA Paths – Part 3 Communication and Recreation | #AIABLTI513.23
Course #17 – (1 hour Audio Course) Understanding and Preventing Sexual Harassment | #AIABLTI510.20

 

 


Manage Your Way to Big Profits

Instructor:  Paul Acker

This course is designed to be the next step in raising your construction management skills to the next level. The class will help prepare the learner for the scope of responsibilities that a professional construction project manager, whether for residential or commercial projects, must be prepared to perform. The course begins with preconstruction services and project start-up tasks. As the project continues, controlling the finances, overseeing the project progress, safety, environmental and energy concerns are just a few of the many tasks a project manager must supervise. Finally, a successful manager must properly close out the project, all while achieving a profit, and securing a satisfied customer.

Upon completion of this course, participants will:

  • Be able to assemble a project team, ensuring they are qualified to perform the work in accordance with specifications and requirements.
  • Recognize the role of OSHA in the workplace and describe the causes of the most common workplace injuries.
  • Understand environmental regulations that govern construction activities for protecting water, air and land quality.
  • Develop a close out procedure that will verify accuracy and completion of all building component systems, including warranties and certifications, prior to issuance of a Certificate of Occupancy.

This Course Covers:

  • Planning and startup
  • Project progress
  • Environmental and energy concerns
  • Safety
  • Close out


2010 ADA Standards: Key Features and Elements

Instructor:  Roger Peck

The ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life, to enjoy employment opportunities, to purchase goods and services, and to participate in State and local government programs and services. The 2010 Standards set minimum requirements, both scoping and technical, for newly designed and constructed, or altered State and local government facilities, public accommodations, and commercial facilities to be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

This video course covers the fourth through tenth chapters of the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.   The material for this course is presented by simple narration and power point video presentation, including on-site, real world video examples in various accessible buildings used by both the public and private sector.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Be able recognize what exterior and interior components can and should comply with ADA standards.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on ADA standards for the construction of either a public or private building.
  • Identify requirements for proper maneuvering space, clearance and accessible routes.
  • Summarize the options available to the design or building professional when designing a facility per the requirements of the ADA Standards.

This course covers:

  • Accessible Routes
  • General Site & Building Elements
  • Plumbing Elements and Facilities
  • Communication Elements and Features
  • Special Rooms, Spaces and Elements
  • Built-In Elements
  • Recreational Facilities


Lead Paint Awareness

Instructor: Scott Corbat

Traditional renovation work can create significant dust-lead hazards if lead-based paint is disturbed. Contaminated dust generated by traditional renovation work can cause lead poisoning in children, pregnant women, healthy adults, and even pets. Practical changes in work practices can minimize and contain dust. The use of lead-safe work practices makes the job safer and reduces liability exposure. This course will teach you how to perform or supervise lead-safe work practices safely and effectively. This course is not a qualifier for RRP Certification. You must complete an EPA accredited course for Certified Renovator Status.

After completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Understand the dangers inherent in lead paint, including the risks and difficulties involved in renovation projects that involve older structures.
  • Summarize the EPA and HUD rules required of Certified Firms and Certified Renovators.
  • Determine if lead-based paint affects your work, and how to educate owners and residents in target housing, or owners and adult representatives in child-occupied facilities about how the work will affect lead in their property, and how to plan the work so that it is lead safe.
  • Outline the process of proper set up so that dust and debris created by the work do not contaminate the property and leave behind lead contaminated dust.
  • Describe how to effectively clean up dust generated by the work performed in the home or child- occupied facility; how Certified Renovators conduct a cleaning verification; and how to dispose of renovation waste.

This course covers:

  • Lead Paint Concerns
  • Regulation
  • Before Beginning Work
  • Containing Dust
  • During the Work
  • Cleaning and Checking Your Work
  • Recordkeeping
  • Training


2010 ADA Standards: Real World Application

Instructor:  Rodger Peck

The ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life — to enjoy employment opportunities, to purchase goods and services, and to participate in State and local government programs and services. The 2010 Standards set minimum requirements – both scoping and technical – for newly designed and constructed, or altered State and local government facilities, public accommodations, and commercial facilities to be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

This 6 hour video course covers the second chapter of the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.  Chapter 2:  Scoping Requirements sets the stage for all the following chapters of the ADA Standards.  In this video course, material is presented by simple narration and power point video presentation, as well as on-site, real world video examples in various accessible buildings, used by both the public and by private businesses.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Recognize how the overall philosophy of the Americans with Disabilities Act can, and does create an environment of opportunity and non-discrimination.
  • Be able recognize what facilities can, and should comply with ADA standards.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on ADA standards for the construction of either a public or private building.
  • Summarize the options available to the design or building professional when designing a facility per the requirements of the ADA Standards.

This Course Covers:

  • Existing Buildings and Facilities
  • General Exceptions
  • Protruding Objects
  • Accessible Routes:  Work areas, Amusement parks, Recreational areas, Entrances, Lifts
  • Accessible Means of Egress
  • Parking Spaces, Passenger Loading Zones and Bus Stops
  • Stairways, Windows, Fire Alarm Systems and Signs
  • Toilet and Bathing Facilities
  • Transportation Facilities
  • Dressing, Fitting, and Locker Rooms
  • Medical Care and Long-term Care Facilities
  • Depositories, Vending Machines, Change Machines, Mail Boxes and Fuel Dispensers
  • Detention, Correctional and Residential Facilities
  • Amusement Rides, Pools & Spas, Boating Facilities and Recreational Facilities

 


Lean on Me – Choosing Railings Carefully

Instructor: Paul Spite

In every major city, premier addresses flaunt high-end high-rise residential towers that make it possible to maximize profit from acquiring high priced land. On these towers, row upon row of sleek railings march toward the heights, declaring at least small pieces of outdoor space as being for private use only.

In conjunction with the design of the whole structure, these railings form a large part of the aesthetic of their projects. They are one of the most visible. All the while, the rails do the job for which they were really designed. That is keeping those behind them alive.

This material briefly examines the materials and methods used to construct barriers against fatal falls. Codes governing the performance of railings will be examined, because safety is the main justification for such regulations. Different ways to meet those guidelines will be discussed. Different looks made possible by technology will be portrayed. Finally, the challenges faced by busy design firms in choosing, detailing, and specifying these integral building components will be examined.

Many new tools for railing design are becoming available to architects, engineers and builders. 3D imaging, 3D modeling, BIM and CAD-CAM programs are changing the perception of what once was possible, especially in the area of renovation projects. New business models are beginning to emerge whereby the development of standard details and standard specifications for railing systems will become practical, for busy architectural firms providing services in multiple locales.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Goals that must be met to achieve building code compliance in the design of railings
  • Increased awareness of ADA guidelines and other regulations besides building codes, that must be satisfied in the design of railings
  • Proper mounting for different railing configurations, being installed on different types of construction
  • Familiarity with different material, design and finish options for railings and dividers
  • Knowledge of issues faced with railing replacements in historic projects, as well as ways to accommodate needed historic detailing while still addressing safety
  • Cognizance of trends toward standardized railing systems, standard details and master specifications, and how these trends help ensure code compliance in the design of railings

This Course Covers:

  • Code Compliance
  • Defending Design Choices
  • Certifications for Railings and Dividers
  • Specifications for Railings
  • Testing to Ensure Compliance
  • Choosing Railing Materials
  • Choosing Railing Design
  • Choosing Railing Finishes
  • Choosing Privacy Dividers
  • Designing Mounting Railings
  • Product Standardization
  • Renovation – Reviving
  • Partners in Projects

 


Getting Decked: And Choosing How That Happens

Instructor:  Paul Spite

Despite our need for shelter from elements, we have always sought opportunity to get back into or close to nature. A large part of our effort to reunite with nature has revolved around creating outdoor spaces adjoining our houses. There, we can get outside to enjoy favorable climate conditions, at whatever time we choose.

These outdoor spaces go by many names and have manifested as lanais, porches, screened enclosures, patios, etc. The most common outdoor spaces, constructed and attached to homes in western cultures, are outdoor decks, balconies and patios. For the purposes of this course, we will explore options available to build decks, balconies, and structures that are usually supported at some point above grade.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • The evolving use of different materials to construct safe and usable outdoor surfaces
  • Strengths and weaknesses of each available outdoor surface option
  • New surfacing options that have been developed to overcome decking material limitations
  • How surfacing materials are being combined to minimize weaknesses and maximize strengths
  • Decking / Balconies made of wood, man-made materials, aluminum, concrete and Porcelain?


Successful Site Design

Instructor:  Wayde Hoppe

While land developers are seeking to maximize their land use and minimize their development costs, governmental regulations are applying pressures on budgets that can kill a project.  Architects are being relied upon to steer site decisions and engineering professionals in order to produce cost effective and functional designs that meet the myriad of growing municipal requirements.  In this 3 hour, fully narrated course you will learn to navigate your entire team through the challenges and pit falls of site development, all the time with an eye toward building design.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Understand the process of securing the appropriate information that will help to develop a scope, schedule, and budget.
  • Be able to develop a building program, including site selection, utilization and wayfinding.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on site standards and utility coordination.
  • Summarize the steps that must be taken to in order to move forward with approvals, bidding and construction.

This Course Covers:

  • Securing Information
  • Programming and Site Evaluation
  • Site Selection, Utilization, and Wayfinding
  • Laying Out the Design
  • Site Standards
  • Utility Coordination
  • Preparing a Site Plan
  • Documents and Contract Administration


Danger in the Damp – Dealing with Mold

Instructor:  Paul Spite

Despite our best efforts to keep it out, water has found its way inside the building. This course examines the question of what to do next, since abandoning the building to its eventual collapse is not usually an option.

The material briefly examines design and construction methods of systems designed to withstand water penetration. An understanding of these systems gives us a starting point in finding sources of intrusion, and a starting point for how to best repair them and prevent further damage. Sealing a failed envelope is the first step in remediation. Otherwise, the appearance of mold will likely be the next step in rendering our damaged buildings uninhabitable.

Once the source of the problem has been addressed, steps can be taken to reclaim full use of the built environment. Assessment of moisture damage must be done next to best determine and prioritize steps toward repair or replacement of damaged components. Immediate and critical remedies are examined, as well as those which can be addressed after a couple days have passed. Lastly, any resulting mold growth must be eliminated, and steps taken to prevent its recurrence.

Because of its power and the many ways water finds to enter our buildings, water intrusion with accompanying mold growth is one of the most discouraging building maintenance issues to address. But we have enough accumulated experience from past battles to handle it far better moving forward.

This course is intended to equip others with that knowledge.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Terminology used to discuss how entrapped water creates problems for building users
  • Measures to retard the infiltration of moisture into built environments
  • Where and why mold growth occurs
  • Testing and inspection to find water damage
  • Systems and procedures to inventory moisture damage following intrusion
  • Immediate and secondary actions steps to take following water intrusion
  • Indoor air quality issues and how to identify them
  • How to deal with mold growth, once it is discovered

This course covers:

  • Overview of Moisture Related Problems
  • Moisture Damage to Buildings
  • Before Damage Occurs
  • Solutions to Water Penetration Issues
  • Maintaining Building Systems as Lines of Defense
  • Dealing with Building Damage from Moisture
  • Air Quality Concerns
  • Dealing with Mold in the Airstream


Successful Building Design

Instructor:  Wayde Hoppe

Developers of commercial, industrial and institutional buildings are driven by return on investment. Today’s building owners are savvy and they seek to balance the initial cost with the payback. Functionality, aesthetics, and methods of code compliance are each guided by financial investment and return. In this course, you will learn, from the foundation to the roof, from the appearance to the operation, from construction to maintenance, tried and proven methods for analyzing design decisions that will lead you to a greater reputation as a designer.

Most architects are familiar with the design process and are usually comfortable with at least one or more of the steps. However, what we learn in school needs to be coupled with the requirements of today’s many codes and regulations, the changes in material development, our client’s demand for a return on investment and the realities of construction budgets.

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Be able to integrate design concepts with current codes and regulations.
  • Translate the intentions and goals of the customer into a safe and cost-effective project.
  • Utilize current materials and goods to ensure proper construction practices.
  • Recognize the importance of meeting the client’s demand for return on investment.

This Course Covers:

  • Defining the Building Type & Ideal Building size
  • Initial Construction Budget
  • Code Analysis
  • Site Evaluation
  • Selecting Consultants
  • Defining the Structural System
  • Selecting the Best Foundation System
  • Creating an Envelope
  • Laying out the Floor Plate
  • HVAC, Plumbing & Electrical Systems
  • Selecting Your Materials
  • Specialty Materials & Design Services


Successful Renovations and Additions

Instructor:  Wayde Hoppe

This course is designed to address the needs of both designers and builders. The topics that will be covered include pre-design, building design, structural concerns, making a watertight envelope, code issues, and construction details. Each of these topics will be addressed in the light of both renovation and addition projects. Real-life stories will relay information that will help any designer to successfully navigate through the challenges of this very specific type of building design.

This course will highlight the right questions, demonstrate how to investigate the important conditions and bring attention to the critical issues. Through the many following examples, this course will offer instruction on how to approach a renovation or addition project with justified confidence.

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Be able to translate the requests of the client into a realistic, safe, and cost-effective project.
  • Gain confidence in the ability to specify and identify any code related issues or requirements in order to facilitate proper construction.
  • Demonstrate how to investigate the important conditions and bring attention to critical issues.
  • Identify and integrate strategies that involve existing conditions, building design, structural concerns, and common issues.

This Course Covers:

  • Renovations
    • Pre-Design: Existing Conditions
    • Design
    • Structural
    • Water-Tight Envelope
    • Code
    • Details
  • Additions
    • Pre-Design
    • Design
    • Structural
    • Code


2010 ADA Standards: Interior Elements

Instructor:  Roger Peck

The ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life — to enjoy employment opportunities, to purchase goods and services, and to participate in State and local government programs and services. The 2010 Standards set minimum requirements – both scoping and technical – for newly designed and constructed, or altered State and local government facilities, public accommodations, and commercial facilities to be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

This three-hour video course covers the sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth chapters of the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.  The material for this course is presented by simple narration and power point video presentation, including on-site, real world video examples in various accessible buildings used by both the public and private sector.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Be able recognize what interior elements can and should comply with ADA standards.
  • Identify the ADA requirements for proper plumbing, communication, special rooms and built-in elements.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on ADA standards for the construction of either a public or private building.
  • Summarize the options available to the design or building professional when designing a facility per the requirements of the ADA Standards.

This course covers:

  • Plumbing Elements and Facilities
  • Communication Elements & Features
  • Special Rooms, Spaces, and Elements
  • Built-In Elements


2010 ADA Standards: Exterior Building Blocks

Instructor:  Roger Peck

The ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life — to enjoy employment opportunities, to purchase goods and services, and to participate in State and local government programs and services. The 2010 Standards set minimum requirements – both scoping and technical – for newly designed and constructed, or altered State and local government facilities, public accommodations, and commercial facilities to be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

This three-hour video course covers the third, fourth and fifth chapters of the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.   The material for this course is presented by simple narration and power point video presentation, including on-site, real world video examples in various accessible buildings used by both the public and private sector.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Be able recognize what exterior components can and should comply with ADA standards.
  • Identify the ADA requirements for proper maneuvering space, clearance and accessible routes.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on ADA standards for the construction of either a public or private building.
  • Summarize the options available to the design or building professional when designing a facility per the requirements of the ADA Standards.

This course covers:

  • Floor and Ground Surfaces
  • Changes in Level
  • Protruding Objects
  • Accessible Routes
  • Ramps
  • Elevators
  • Parking Spaces
  • Passenger Loading Zones


Construction Documents For Successful Projects

Instructor:  Wayde Hoppe

A well prepared and accurate technical specification can be easily undone if Divisions 00 and 01 of the project manual are deficient. The ‘front-end’ specification, or general conditions, is the tool that directs the contractor from the day he is introduced to the project through to completion. Without it, the architect, the client, and the builder are vulnerable to being sadly surprised. A well written ‘front-end’ can protect the architect and the builder from accusations of neglect, cost over-runs, demands for an expansion of the scope and much more. This course will teach the many elements of the front-end specification that are essential to success.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Be able to integrate design concepts with current codes and regulations.
  • Translate the intentions and goals of the customer into a safe and cost-effective project.
  • Understand and be able to comply with federal laws if the project is paid for with governmental funds.

 


Successful Use of Pre-Engineered Metal Buildings

Instructor:  Wayde Hoppe

This course will cover the advantages and disadvantages of using a pre-engineered metal building and why PEMB’s are economical. We will examine what needs to be considered when designing the foundations, building envelope, building systems, industrial equipment as well as code considerations. This lesson should equip the designer and builder to know the basic facts about Pre-Engineered Metal Buildings.

After completing this course, you will be able to:

  • Outline the advantages and disadvantages of Pre-Engineered buildings
  • Identify the code requirements related to bearing capacity of foundations and slabs
  • Describe hazardous occupancies and control areas that are often found in this type of structure
  • Summarize the code considerations and issues related to special industrial construction

This course covers:

  • Foundations
  • Equipment
  • Systems
  • Envelope
  • Code
  • Special Industrial Issues
  • Geology
  • Ground Water
  • Grounding
  • Repairs
  • Decorative Shapes
  • Deferred Submittals

 


 

ADA Paths – Part 1 No One Left Behind

Instructor: Paul Spite

In September of 2010, the U.S. Department of Justice published the “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design,” a comprehensive set of standards about designing buildings to facilitate their use by the handicapped. The publication contained two parts, one establishing accessibility laws for facilities built with public funds, and one providing guidelines for public buildings built by private entities. Since that time, numerous model codes, building codes and published standards have been released, based in part or in whole on those standards, creating some confusion as to what exactly is required. This course is a comprehensive overview of the original guidelines and their intent.

The “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design,” though quite lengthy, have been broken out and grouped into nine categories of information, presented in the following sequence. A series introduction discusses the creation of the standards and their applicability as regulations. This course then focuses on the additional parts of the standards addressing; accessible parking facilities and accessible building entryways.

An attempt was made to simplify these regulations and present them in an orderly and comprehensible fashion. Hopefully, the resulting information will be of use in designing public accommodations and commercial facilities, making them readily accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • An understanding of the difference between accessibility laws mandated for buildings constructed using governmental funds, accessibility guidelines for buildings built by private entities for public use, and practical exceptions to both
  • Design principles to ensure parking facilities accommodate use by the handicapped
  • An overview of the importance of providing accessible routes between parking facilities and building points of entry
  • Materials and methods to construct walking surfaces allowing easy passage and use by the handicapped, including stairs and ramps.
  • An overview of design principles resulting in making vertical transportation equipment, like lifts and elevators, of better use to the handicapped
  • Maneuvering clearances needed at, and between, doors and gates

This Course Covers:

  • Compliance Dates
  • Scope of Coverage
  • Exceptions
  • Requirements Pertaining to Specific Building Types
  • Additional Exemptions
  • Parking Space Requirements
  • Location of Parking Facilities
  • Physical Characteristics of Parking Facilities
  • Accessible Routes
  • Entrances
  • Doors, Doorways and Gates
  • Elevators and Lifts
  • Security Barriers
  • Accessible Means of Egress
  • Accessible Routes
  • Stairways
  • Case Study
  • General Provisions
  • Doors, Doorways, and Gates

 

 


 

ADA Paths – Part 3 Communication and Recreation

Instructor: Paul Spite

In September of 2010, the U.S. Department of Justice published the “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design,” a comprehensive set of standards about designing buildings to facilitate their use by the handicapped. The publication contained two parts, one establishing accessibility laws for facilities built with public funds, and one providing guidelines for public buildings built by private entities. Since that time, numerous model codes, building codes and published standards have been released, based in part or in whole on those standards, creating some confusion as to what exactly is required. This course is a comprehensive overview of the original guidelines and their intent.

The “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design,” though quite lengthy, have been broken out and grouped into nine categories of information, presented in the following sequence. A short series introduction discusses the creation of the standards and their applicability as regulations. This course then focuses on the additional parts of the standards addressing; communication features for the disabled, consideration of finishes to use with mobility aids and recreational facilities to provide continued enjoyment by the handicapped.

An attempt was made to simplify these regulations and present them in an orderly and comprehensible fashion. Hopefully, the resulting information will be of use in designing public accommodations and commercial facilities, making them readily accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Features and functions of alarm and notification systems in facilities designed to be accessible and usable by disabled occupants of all descriptions.
  • Characteristics and defining features of visual, Braille, pictograms and tactile characters, ensuring that signage in accessible locations is legible to, and usable for, all occupants
  • Consideration of flooring surfaces and finishes, including allowable changes in level, to ensure smooth passage over them
  • Features of various facilities designed for recreation, so as to make continued enjoyment possible for the disabled.

This Course Covers:

    • Communication Features in General
    • Notifications
    • Signage
    • Accessible Telephones
    • Transportation Facilities
    • Assistive Listening Systems
    • Accessible Automatic Teller and Fare Machines
    • Accessible Two-Way Communication Systems
    • Surfacing Materials
    • Furniture
    • Recreational Opportunities
    • Accessible Amusement Rides
    • Accessible Recreational Boating Facilities
    • Accessible Fishing Piers and Platforms
    • Accessible Exercise Machines and Equipment
    • Accessible Golf Facilities
    • Accessible Miniature Golf Facilities
    • Play Areas
    • Accessible Swimming Pools, Wading Pools, and Spas
    • Accessible Shooting Facilities with Firing Positions

 

 


Understanding and Preventing Sexual Harassment

Instructor: J. MacDowell

This one-hour course will provide learners with an understanding of sexual harassment, forms of harassment, reporting procedures for harassment, and employer responsibility and liability in the prevention of sexual harassment. Extensive examples, scenarios, and case studies are included for real-world applications.

You will learn to:

  • Recognize sexual harassment forms and types
  • Understand reporting procedures for harassment
  • Acquire knowledge of whistle blower protections
  • Apply class concepts to scenarios and examples