Reciprical Package
32-Hour

$279.00

Fulfills Requirements for ALL 50 States
32 Credit Hours
VIEW COURSE DETAILS

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Description

Architects 32 Hour Complete Renewal Package – All 50 States

Meets ONLINE state continuing education requirements.  Also includes a 2-hour ethics course to meet Minnesota and Nebraska Requirements

New York & Nebraska require architects to take part of their required hours in-person. Check your state page for details.

This 32-hour package contains:

Course #1 – (1 hour Online Video) 2017 Gable End Anchoring and Framing in High Velocity Hurricane Zones Advanced | #AIABLTI323.2 / FL#9878674 FL ADV BUILDING CODE
Course #2 – (1 hour Online Narrated) 2017 ADV Thermal & Moisture Protection: Keeping the Weather Out | #AIABLTI324.2 / FL #9878673 FL ADV BUILDING CODE
Course #3 – (5 hour Online Narrated) CA Building Code Division 2: Accessibility | AIABLTI331 CA ADA COURSE
Course #4 – (3 hour Online Narrated) AIA Successful Building Design AIABLTI340.5
Course #5 – (3 hour Online Narrated) AIA Construction Documents For Successful Projects#AIABLTI450
Course #6 – (3 hour Online Narrated) Getting Decked: And Choosing How That Happens | #AIABLTI451
Course #7 — (4 hour Online Narrated) Aging in Place – Eliminating Pitfalls | # AIABLTI459
Course #8 — (4 hour Online Narrated) Acoustical Design in Modern Architecture AIABLTI342
Course #9 — (3 hour Online Narrated) Danger in the Damp – Dealing with Mold | #AIABLTI454
Course #10 — (3 hour Online Narrated) Drier By Design – Designing to Keep Water Out | #AIABLTI453
Course #11 — (2 hour Online Narrated) Minnesota and Nebraska Required Ethics | #AIABLTI456

 

 

 

Credit(s) earned on completion of this course will be reported to AIA CES for AIA members. Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members will be available to print upon completion of this course. This course is registered with AIA CES for continuing professional education.

2017 Florida Gable End Anchoring & Framing
in High Velocity Hurricane Zones
Advanced Internet Module 817.1/612574/9878674


Course Outline

This one hour internet course is intended to provide a minimum of one hour of instruction of Advanced continuing education for Florida certificate holders and registrants pertaining to Gable End Anchoring and Framing.  Inspection of residential buildings that endured past hurricanes in Florida has shown that one of the most damaged structural components in residential homes is the gable-end wall or the gable-end truss for timber wall or masonry wall constructions.  This course is based on the 2017 Florida Building Code changes that surround the most common causes of gable end failure during high velocity hurricane events.

METHOD OF PRESENTATION:  This distance learning course is formatted specifically for internet delivery.  Course presentation will require student participation through section reviews and assessments.  This method of course presentation assures that student will have direct control of course delivery.

Course material will be presented using multimedia formats, including but not limited to:  static text, narration, photos and illustrations. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to link to related resource websites and applicable articles.  Participants will be able to access instructor support via email (24 hour) and telephone communication (during normal daytime office hours).

A ten-question, multiple choice assessment at the end of the course must be completed with a 70% pass rate in order to complete the course and print a certificate of completion.


                                                                  

The objective of this course is to inform building contractors of proven methods of building sustainable roof structures when built in areas subjected to high velocity winds.

1. Introduction–5 minutes

a. Categories

b. Regions

c. Practical Perspective

2. Reinforcing Roof to Wall Connections–5 minutes

a. Examples of transition points

b. Roof to wall connections

 

3. High-Velocity Hurricane Zone–40 minutes

a. Section 1513 Definitions (5 minutes)

b. Section 2121 High-Velocity Hurricane Zones Construction Details (7 minutes)

i. Scope
ii. Masonry

c. Section 2207 Steel Joists (3 minutes)
d. Section 2212 Gable Endwalls (2 minutes)
e. Section 2301 General (5 minutes)
e. Section 2314 to 2322 High-Velocity Hurricane Zones (18 minutes)

i. Wood Members
ii. Unit Stresses
iii. Vertical Framing
iv. Horizontal Framing
v. Anchorage
vi. Sheathing

4. Assessment–10 minutes

a. Ten question quiz


 

2017 Thermal and Moisture Protection:
Keeping the Weather Out

Florida Building Code 6th Edition (2017) Residential
1 Hour Credit

Advanced Internet Module 635.2/0612612/9878673


Course Description

Protecting buildings from the weather and moisture related problems is important for all building professionals.  In areas of high rainfall, and in northern climates, it is even more important that designers, builders, and their subcontractors use “Best Practice” procedures to carefully plan and install thermal and weather resistant components.  This course, based on the 2017 Florida Building codes, pertains to moisture and weather related problems, and will identify practical solutions based on those requirements.  This internet course is intended to provide a minimum of one hour of continuing education to professionals involved in planning, design and construction of structures susceptible to moisture related issues.

METHOD OF PRESENTATION:  This distance learning course is formatted specifically for internet delivery.  Course presentation will require student participation through an assessment.  This method of course presentation assures that student will have direct control of course delivery.

Course material will be presented using multimedia formats, including but not limited to:  static text, photos and illustrations. There are no sound or video clips in this course.  Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to link to related resource websites and applicable articles.  Participants will be able to access instructor support via email (24 hour) and telephone communication (during normal daytime office hours).

After completing this course participants will be able to:

      • Summarize the key elements (either natural or mechanical) of a properly ventilated structure.
      • List and describe at least three specific installation techniques and/or materials that contribute to a properly constructed roof system.
      • Outline at least one design strategy based on “best practices” for the construction of buildings in areas with  high humidity.
      • Identify and implement proven methods that will effectively divert moisture from the foundation of a structure.

COURSE SYLLABUS

Keeping the Weather Out (3 minutes)

1.  Rationale

2.  Performance Objectives

Foundations (6 minutes)

1.  Ensuring a Dry Foundation

a.  Drains
b.  Grading
c.  Dampproofing and Waterproofing
d.  Crawl Spaces
e.  Gutters and Downspouts
f.  Insect Infestation

House Wrap and Underlayment (2 minutes)

1.  Definitions and Types

Corrosion and Decay Resistance (2 minutes)

1.  Recommendations:  Preservative-treated wood and fasteners

The Building Frame (4 minutes)

1. Lumber and Moisture:  Negative Effects

2. Foundation to Wall Transition

Siding (18 minutes)

1. Structural Integrity:  Code

2. Wood Siding

3. Vinyl Siding

4.  Fiber Cement Siding

5.  Lap Siding

6.  Brick Veneer

7.  Exterior Insulation Finishing System and Stucco

Windows and Doors (10 minutes)

1.  Flashing

2.  Caulking

3.  Windows and Installation

4.  Doors and Installation

5.  Skylights

Roofs (11 minutes)

1. Moisture Penetration

2. Weather Protection

3.  Roof Valleys

4.  Flashing

5.  Sheathing and Built up Roofs

6.  Repairs

Ventilation (7 minutes)

1.  Code Requirements

2.  Natural Attic Ventilation

3.  Doing the Job

4.  Installing Rafter Vents

Final Assessment 10 Questions


California Building Code: Division 2: Accessibility
Course #AIABLTI331
Architects Training Institute
A Division of Certified Training Institute
Provider #50119841


About the Instructor: Rodger B. Peck

 

(If you are being audited by the Board, please print out this section It contains the information needed for the continuing education audit.)

Rodger has over 25 years experience building, teaching and consulting with individuals in the construction industry. He has conducted extensive research and study in developing, compiling and writing Americans with Disabilities Act courses for architects, engineers, and commercial and residential builders. Rodger holds a vast amount of certifications and approvals, both State specific and nationally:

  • Michigan Residential Builders License #2101137251
  • American Institute of Architect (AIA) approved instructor
  • International Distance Education Certified (IDECC) Qualified #67861
  • Lead Paint Safety (RRP) Certified Instructor through the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
  • Alabama Licensing Board approved instructor
  • Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) approved instructor
  • Georgia Board for Residential and General Contractors (BRGC) approved instructor
  • Massachusetts Department of Public Safety (DPS) approved instructor
  • Michigan Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) approved instructor
  • Minnesota Department of Licensing and Industry (DLI) approved instructor
  • Oregon Construction Contractor Board (CCB) approved instructor
  • Utah Department of Occupational and Professional Licensing (DOPL) approved instructor
  • Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation (DPOR) approved instructor

Rodger has been an instructor for Certified Training Institute for more than a decade. Architects Training Institute is a division of Certified Training Institute. Our instructor phone number is 231-938-3373, or 1-800-727-7104.


Course Description

The ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life — to enjoy employment opportunities, to purchase goods and services, and to participate in State and local government programs and services. The standards set minimum requirements – both scoping and technical – for newly designed and constructed, or altered state and local government facilities, public accommodations, and commercial facilities to be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

This five hour video course covers the second chapter of the ADA Standards for Accessible Design and includes the California modifications found in Division 2, Chapter 11B of the California Building Code including the most recent changes. While an individual designer may be able to use the ADA for personal or generic residential design, the California code should be used by registered design professionals and enforcement officials and applied when the project is for public use within the state of California. In this video course, the material is presented by simple narration and power point video presentation, as well as on-site, real-world video examples in various accessible buildings, used by both the public and private businesses.

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize how the overall philosophy of the Americans with Disabilities Act can, and does create an environment of opportunity and non-discrimination.
  • Be able recognize what facilities can, and should comply with Chapter 11B Accessibility of the California Building Code.
  • Outline at least one design strategy based on accessibility standards for the construction of either a public or private building.
  • Summarize the options available to the design or building professional when designing a facility per the requirements of Chapter 11B.

Course Syllabus

Lesson One 201-203

1.  Application
2.  Existing Buildings and Facilities

3.  General Exceptions

Lesson Two 204-206.2.7

1.  Protruding Objects
2.  Operable Parts

3.  Accessible Routes

Lesson Three 206.2.8-206.8

1.  Accessible Routes: Work areas, Amusement parks, Recreational areas, Entrances, Lifts

Lesson Four 207-212.3

1.  Accessible Means of Egress
2.  Parking Spaces

3.  Passenger Loading Zones and Bus Stops
4.  Stairways
5.  Drinking Fountains
6.  Kitchens, Kitchenettes, and Sinks

Lesson Five 213-216.12

1.  Toilet Facilities and Bathing Facilities
2.  Washing Machines and Clothes Dryers
3.  Fire Alarm Systems
4.  Signs

Lesson Six 217-221.4

1. Telephones
2. Transportation Facilities

3. Assistive Listening Systems
4. Automatic Teller Machines and Fare Machines
5. Assembly Areas

Lesson Seven 222-227.4

1.  Dressing, Fitting, and Locker Rooms
2.  Medical Care and Long-term Care Facilities

3.  Transient Lodging Guest Rooms
4.  Storage
5.  Dining Surfaces and Work Surfaces
6.  Sales and Service

Lesson Eight 228-233.3.5

1.  Depositories, Vending Machines, Change Machines, Mail Boxes and Fuel Dispensers
2.  Windows

3.  Two-Way Communication Systems
4.  Judicial Facilities
5.  Detention Facilities and Correctional Facilities
6.  Residential Facilities

Lesson Nine 234-243

1.  Amusement Rides
2.  Recreational Boating Facilities

3.  Exercise Machines and Equipment
4.  Golf Facilities
5.  Miniature Golf Facilities
6.  Play Areas
7.  Saunas and Steam Rooms
8.  Swimming Pools, Wading Pools and Spas
9.  Shooting Facilities with Firing Positions


 

Successful Building Design

 


COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Description

Developers of commercial, industrial and institutional buildings are driven by return on investment. Today’s building owners are savvy and they seek to balance the initial cost with the payback. Functionality, aesthetics, and methods of code compliance are each guided by financial investment and return. In this course, you will learn, from the foundation to the roof, from the appearance to the operation, from construction to maintenance, tried and proven methods for analyzing design decisions that will lead you to a greater reputation as a designer.

Most architects are familiar with the design process and are usually comfortable with at least one or more of the steps. However, what we learn in school needs to be coupled with the requirements of today’s many codes and regulations, the changes in material development, our client’s demand for a return on investment and the realities of construction budgets.

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Be able to integrate design concepts with current codes and regulations.
  • Translate the intentions and goals of the customer into a safe and cost effective project.
  • Utilize current materials and goods to ensure proper construction practices.
  • Recognize the importance of meeting the client’s demand for return on investment.

BUILDING DESIGN

Chapter 1

1. Defining the Building Type
2. Initial Building Program
3. Initial Construction Budget
4. Ideal Building Size
5. Establishing the Construction Classification
6. Code Analysis

Chapter 2

1. Site Evaluation
2. Reality Check
3. Building Concept
4. Selecting Consultants
5. Defining the Structural System
6. Selecting the Best Foundation System

Chapter 3

1. Creating an Envelope
2. Laying out the Floor Plate
3. Dealership Videos

Chapter 4

1. Specialty Functions
2. HVAC Systems
3. Plumbing Systems
4.  Electrical
5. Selecting Your Materials

Chapter 5

1. Specialty Materials
2. Specialty Design Services


 

CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS
FOR SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS

 


COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Description

A well prepared and accurate technical specification can be easily undone if Divisions 00 and 01 of the project manual are deficient. The ‘front-end’ specification, or general conditions, is the tool that directs the contractor from the day he is introduced to the project through to completion. Without it, the architect, the client, and the builder are vulnerable to being sadly surprised. A well written ‘front-end’ can protect the architect and the builder from accusations of neglect, cost over-runs, demands for an expansion of the scope and much more. This course will teach the many elements of the front-end specification that are essential to success.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Be able to integrate design concepts with current codes and regulations.
  • Translate the intentions and goals of the customer into a safe and cost-effective project.
  • Understand and be able to comply with federal laws if the project is paid for with governmental funds.
  • Specify and identify any code related issues or requirements in order to facilitate proper construction.

Chapter 1 (25 minutes)

1. Introduction
2. Division 00
3. Site Visit
4. Bonding
5. Addenda
6. Document Distribution
7. Alternates
8. Bid Forms

Chapter 2 (25 minutes)

1. Division 01
2. Changes
3. Allowances
4. Unit Pricing
5. Liquidated Damages
6. Insurance
7. Damage to Structures

Chapter 3 (25 minutes)

1. Notice of Commencement
2. Notice of Substantial Completion
3. Substitutions
4. Dimensions
5. Pay Applications

Chapter 4 (25 minutes)

1. Occupational Requirements
2. Storage of Materials
3. Commissioning
4. Utilities
5. Submittals
6. Obsolete Materials
7. Scheduling

Chapter 5 (25 minutes)

1. Permitting
2. Electronic Use of Drawings
3. Quality Assurance
4. Contractor’s Use of Site
5. Owner Furnished Products and Labor
6. Sustainable Design
7. Conclusion


GETTING DECKED: AND CHOOSING HOW THAT HAPPENS


COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Description

Despite our need for shelter from elements, we have always sought opportunity to get back into or close to nature. A large part of our effort to reunite with nature has revolved around creating outdoor spaces adjoining our houses. There, we can get outside to enjoy favorable climate conditions, at whatever time we choose.

These outdoor spaces go by many names and have manifested as lanais, porches, screened enclosures, patios, etc. The most common outdoor spaces, constructed and attached to homes in western cultures, are outdoor decks, balconies and patios. For the purposes of this course, we will explore options available to build decks, balconies, and structures that are usually supported at some point above grade.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • The evolving use of different materials to construct safe and usable outdoor surfaces
  • Strengths and weaknesses of each available outdoor surface option
  • New surfacing options that have been developed to overcome decking material limitations
  • How surfacing materials are being combined to minimize weaknesses and maximize strengths

GETTING DECKED: AND CHOOSING HOW THAT HAPPENS

Lesson 1

Decking / Balconies Made of Wood

  • Support Structures for Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Why Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Advantages of Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Issues with Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Installing Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Maintenance of Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Available Finishes for Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Surface Preparation

Lesson 2

Decking / Balconies Made of Wood cont.

  • Paint
  • Waxes
  • Oils
  • Single Application Deck Finish
  • Traditional Polymers
  • Stain, Sealer, and Stain / Sealer Combinations
  • Hard Wax Oils
  • Life Cycle Costs of Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Optimal Use for Wood Decks / Balconies
  • Limitations for Use of Wood Decks / Balconies

Lesson 3

Decking / Balconies Made of Man-made Materials

  • Support Structures for Decks / Balconies of Man-made Materials
  • Why Man-made Decking
  • Installation of Man-made Decking
  • Products Available in Man-made Decking
  • Extruded Vinyl Decking
  • Extruded Composite Decking
  • Issues with Man-made Decking
  • Life Cycle Costs of Man-made Decking
  • Maintenance of Man-made Decking
  • Optimal Use for Man-made Decking
  • Limitations for Use of Man-made Decking

Lesson 4

Decking / Balconies Made of Aluminum

  • Support Structures for Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Why Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Installing Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Advantages of Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Available Finishes for Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Issues with Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Life Cycle Costs of Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Maintenance of Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Optimal Use for Aluminum Decks / Balconies
  • Limitations for Use of Aluminum Decks / Balconies

Decking / Balconies Made of Concrete

  • Support Structures for Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Why Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Installing Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Advantages of Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Available Finishes for Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Issues with Concrete Decks / Balconies Life
  • Cycle Costs of Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Maintenance of Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Optimal Use for Concrete Decks / Balconies
  • Limitations for Use of Concrete Decks / Balconies

Lesson 6

Decking / Balconies Made of Porcelain?

  • Support Structures for Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Why Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Available Finishes for Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Installing Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Advantages of Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Issues with Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Life Cycle Costs of Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Maintenance of Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Optimal Use for Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Limitations for Use of Porcelain Decks / Balconies
  • Where Do We Go from Here?

Assessment

 


Aging in Place – Eliminating Pitfalls


In millions of homes across our country, and in the homes of people we love, existing residences are slowly but surely becoming prisons for their occupants. This happens as the aging process inevitably removes our ability to successfully navigate stairs and perform daily tasks required to live and survive independent. Societal options exist to move from private residences into congregate living facilities, where oversight and care are offered at various levels for those facing challenges. But few are interested in thus surrendering their independence. We prefer to just age-in-place.

It is possible to remain at home as physical and / or mental deterioration makes doing so more challenging. Given the amount of research that preceded establishing design standards to accommodate the handicapped, new structures can be designed which are far more user friendly to the elderly. Changes to existing homes can also be made in incremental steps as needs arise, just not as efficiently as doing so from scratch.

The knowledge and technology to enable our elders to stay at home are well established. All that is lacking are finances to do so, the time to do so, the will to do so and wide-spread dissemination of knowledge on how to do so.

The last of those issues is addressed in this work.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • A thorough understanding of physical challenges that make aging-in-place more difficult.
  • An increased awareness of cognitive issues that make aging-in-place more difficult.
  • Resolvable issues faced by the elderly while navigating outside the home.
  • Changes in typical lighting strategies that are beneficial to an aging population.
  • Proper design of exterior amenities to facilitate increased enjoyment of nature by an older population.
  • The impacts of different choices in finishes in reducing dangers faced while aging-in-place.
  • Design choices that make common areas in multi-family housing more user friendly to the aged.
  • Changes in cabinetry needed to accommodate use by the handicapped

Course Outline

Introduction
The Scope of This Work
Problems to be Expected with Aging
Expect Resistance

  • Don’t Expect Gratitude
  • Graduated Change
    • Phase 1 – Fairly Unaware
    • Phase 2 – Pondering
    • Phase 3 – Implementing
    • Maintenance

Potential Changes Ahead
Outside the Home

  • Public Transportation
  • Pick a Walking Route
  • Outdoor Car Parking
  • Site Lighting
  • Site Furnishings
  • Landscaping
  • Gardens
  • Private Exterior Spaces
  • Exterior Wayfinding
    • Building Exterior
    • Accommodating Pets
    • Outside the Entry

Common Areas in Multi-Family

  • Circulation – Lobby
  • Interior Wayfinding
  • Mail Rooms
  • Administration Offices
  • Common Restrooms
  • Storage Areas
  • Common Dining
  • Laundry Facilities
  • Community Room
    • Fitness Center
    • Smoking Area

Inside an Individual Home

  • In General
  • Flexible Spaces
  • Foyer / Entry
  • Living Room
  • Kitchen / Dining:
    • Kitchen / Dining Cabinets
    • Kitchen / Dining Appliances
    • Kitchen / Dining Plumbing
  • Bathrooms
    • Bathroom Cabinets
    • Bathroom Hardware
    • Bathroom Accessories
    • Bathroom Finishes
    • Bathroom Power
  • Bedrooms
    • Bedroom Closets
    • Bedroom Flooring
  • Laundry Room
  • Garage or Carport
  • Storage Areas
  • Hallways / Corridors
  • Stairs and Ramps
  • Additional Vertical Transportation
  • Finishes in General
  • Flooring
  • Windows
  • Window Coverings
  • Doors:
    • Needed Clearance Varies by Door Type
    • Hands-Free Entry
    • Door Hardware
  • Furnishings
  • Acoustics

Alarms and Alerts

  • Emerging Technologies
  • Other Sensor Based Technologies

HVAC System Concerns
Electrical Concerns

  • General Lighting Concerns
  • Lighting Control Types
  • Outlets

Other Available Resources

  • General Aging-in-Place
  • Specific Topics
  • General Building Resources
  • Accessibility / Universal Design
  • Health During Aging

Additional Thoughts

  • Cost
  • Additional Obstacles
    • What’s Behind This Wall
    • Cabinetry
    • Footprint

Conclusion


ACOUSTICAL DESIGN IN MODERN ARCHITECTURE


COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Description

Unwanted sound impacts and affects inhabitants of our created spaces. If it not already, controlling noise will quickly become a mandated concern for designers. Attesting to increasing regulatory focus on noise, there is a recent proliferation of standards, guidelines, and codes regarding acoustics.

Very soon, many of these guidelines will no longer be mere suggestions. Most concerns covered in these standards can be addressed with a basic understanding on how sound travels and is reflected, blocked, absorbed, or transmitted by materials and assemblies chosen in designing envelopes. 

Acoustic design is best addressed in an incremental fashion. This course was written to do just that. Fundamentals are first covered, including basic principles regarding sound, how its energy moves through matter, how its path and intensity can be altered, and how success in the manipulation of sound is measured. Known design strategies are discussed for controlling sound moving; from exterior to interior spaces, from interior spaces to adjacent spaces, within interior spaces, through structural components, and through building systems. Design considerations are outlined for numerous common building functions. Finally, acoustic codes and guidelines in existence now, are listed for consideration.

After completing this course  participants will be able to:

  • Design objectives and recommended best practices for building types where poor acoustics directly impact productivity and health of the users.
  • Determine sources of noise that negatively impact users of built environments, generated both outside and from within buildings, including both air borne and structure borne sounds.
  • Outline basic design practices for effectively controlling; sound transfer between exterior and interior spaces, noise transfer from interior space to adjacent spaces, and the reverberation of sound generated within spaces.
  • Provide an overview of regulations and guidelines that either are, or may become law underscoring a need for competency in acoustic design, before legislatures make designing for noise control mandatory.

ACOUSTICAL DESIGN IN MODERN ARCHITECTURE

Lesson 1 (25 minutes)

1. Acoustics in General
2. General Vocabulary Regarding Sound
3. General Nature of Sound
4. Production
5. Control
6. Sound Transmission
7. Reception
8. Audible Sound Frequencies
9. Effects of Sound on People

Lesson 2 (30 minutes)

1. Principals of Acoustics
2. Sound Behavior Patterns
3. Primary Acoustic Measurements

a. NRC – Noise Reduction Coefficient
b. STC – Sound Transmission Class
c. IIC – Impact Insulation Class

4. Additional Measurements Sometimes Encountered

a. RT – Reverberation Time
b. CAC – Ceiling Attenuation Class
c. AC – Articulation Class

5. Amplified Sound
6. Design Solutions for Specific Concerns Regardles of Project Type
7. Resisting transmission of noise from the exterior into the interior of a space

Lesson 3 (30 minutes)

1. Resisting horizontal transmission of noise from space to adjacent space
2. Resisting vertical transmission of noise from space to adjacent space, including structure borne sound
3. Controlling reverberation time of sound generated within a space
4. Masking unwanted noise with sound generating systems
5. Controlling system sounds, especially HVAC noises, that enter a space

Lesson 4 (25 minutes)

1. Design Considerations by Specific Project Type

a. Speaking Venues: Auditorium
b. Speaking Venues: Lecture Hall
c. Speaking Venues: Meeting or Conference Room
d. Performance Venues: Dance Hall
e. Performance Venues: Movie Theatre

Lesson 5 (25 minutes)

1. Design Considerations by Specific Project Type (cont)

a. Performance Venues: Recording Studio
b. Performance Venues: Home Theatre
c. Dining Venues: Dining Hall / Restaurant
d. Dining Venues: Outdoor Dining
e. Common Use Venues: Common Gathering / Multi-use

Lesson 6 (25 minutes)

1. Design Considerations by Specific Project Type (cont)

a. Common Use Venues: Atrium
b. Common Use Venues: Hallway
c. Healthcare Venues: Healthcare Facility
d. Healthcare Venues: MRI Suite
e. Work Venues: Office
f. Work Venues: Home Office

Lesson 7 (20 minutes)

1. Design Considerations by Specific Project Type (cont)

a. Education Venues: Classroom
b. Education Venues: Library
c. Fitness Venues: Gym
d. Multi-family Venues: Hotel
e. Multi-family Venues: Multi-family Housing

Lesson 8 (20 minutes)

1. Design Considerations by Specific Project Type (cont)

a. Worship Venues – Churches

2. Codes and Testing
3. Applicable to All Building Types
4. Applicable to Schools
5. Applicable to Health Care
6. Applicable to Offices
7. Applicable to Outdoor Noise Guidelines

In Summation

Assessment – 20 minutes

 


Danger in the Damp – Dealing with Mold


COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Description

Despite our best efforts to keep it out, water has found its way inside the building. This course examines the question of what to do next, since abandoning the building to its eventual collapse is not usually an option.

The material briefly examines design and construction methods of systems designed to withstand water penetration. An understanding of these systems gives us a starting point in finding sources of intrusion, and a starting point for how to best repair them and prevent further damage. Sealing a failed envelope is the first step in remediation. Otherwise, the appearance of mold will likely be the next step in rendering our damaged buildings uninhabitable.

Once the source of the problem has been addressed, steps can be taken to reclaim full use of the built environment. Assessment of moisture damage must be done next to best determine and prioritize steps toward repair or replacement of damaged components. Immediate and critical remedies are examined, as well as those which can be addressed after a couple days have passed. Lastly, any resulting mold growth must be eliminated, and steps taken to prevent its recurrence.

Because of its power and the many ways water finds to enter our buildings, water intrusion with accompanying mold growth is one of the most discouraging building maintenance issues to address. But we have enough accumulated experience from past battles to handle it far better moving forward.

This course is intended to equip others with that knowledge.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • Terminology used to discuss how entrapped water creates problems for building users
  • Measures to retard the infiltration of moisture into built environments
  • Where and why mold growth occurs
  • Testing and inspection to find water damage
  • Systems and procedures to inventory moisture damage following intrusion
  • Immediate and secondary actions steps to take following water intrusion
  • Indoor air quality issues and how to identify them
  • How to deal with mold growth, once it is discovered

Danger in the Damp–Dealing with Mold

Overview of Moisture Related Problems

  • Don’t Let the Water In
  • Glossary of Terms

The Scope of the Problem

  • Moisture Damage to Buildings
  • Monetary Loss Due to Moisture Problems
  • General Moisture Intrusion
  • The Mold / Moisture Connection
  • Definition of Mold
  • Controlling Mold Growth by Controlling Moisture

Before Building Damage Occurs

  • Basic Moisture Movement

Solutions to Water Penetration Issues

  • Blocking Transport Paths
  • Wet by Design
  • What About Existing Buildings?
  • Necessary Ventilation
  • Improving Air Quality and Ventilation
  • Addressing Moisture Problems in Various Building Systems

Maintaining Building Systems as Lines of Defense

  • Maintaining Site Drainage
  • Maintaining Foundations
  • Maintaining Walls
  • Maintaining Roofing and Ceilings
  • Maintaining Plumbing Systems
  • Maintaining HVAC Systems
  • Making Your Building Weathertight

Dealing with Building Damage from Moisture

  • Testing and Remediation of Dampness and Mold
  • Testing for Contaminants
  • Inventory Damaged Materials
  • Inventory and Response to Ceiling Damage
  • Inventory and Response to Drywall / Plaster Damage
  • Inventory and Response to Carpet Damage
  • Inventory and Response to Electric Systems Damage
  • Inventory and Response to Furniture Damage
  • Inventory and Response to Paper / Records Damage
  • Specific Instructions for Specific Materials

Air Quality Concerns

  • Air Quality in General
  • Health Concerns with Dampness
  • Changes in Indoor Air Quality Attributable to Mold
  • Air Quality in Schools

Dealing with Mold in the Airstream

  • Reiteration of Basic Remedies
  • Procedures – Problem Found in the First 48 Hours Following a Leak
  • Procedures – Problem Discovered after 48 Hours Have Passed
  • Cleaning up Mold

Summary


Drier By Design – Designing to Keep Water Out


COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Description

With erosion paths cut into solid rock as solid evidence, water in various forms contains immense power to eat away or destroy whatever is in its path. Whether it takes a year, two hundred or ten thousand, without intervention, water can and will destroy our man-made structures. Once a problem develops that opens a pathway for intrusion, one rainy season can render a building unsuitable for human use.

We have the knowledge and tools to combat such destruction of our structures. We implement counterattacks in the design stage, during construction, and afterwards with proactive maintenance, but the battle against water begins in the design phase.

Moisture resistance principles and methods are discussed in a systematic fashion, as in one building system at a time. Fundamentals are first covered, including basic principles of water behavior and the multiple paths it takes while invading buildings. A thorough knowledge of how destruction begins and escalates drives the known design principles and material decisions used to stop such migration. Practical solutions are then discussed in detail.

The discussion is needed. The physical price tag for both our structures and their occupants is too high to allow water free entry into our occupied spaces.

This course teaches the following specific knowledge and skills:

  • A basic understanding of how water moves, migrates, and behaves
  • Typical sources of excess moisture in our built environments
  • Proactive prevention of unwanted moisture through planning and design
  • Methods used during construction to prevent the intrusion of water
  • Post-construction prevention of leakage by building envelope inspection
  • Common points of failure through which water can gain entrance
  • Prevention of water intrusion through control of condensation

Drier By Design–Designing to Keep Water Out

INTRODUCTION

1. Glossary of Terms Regarding Water Intrusion
2. Water Behavior

  • General Water Infiltration
  • Hitting a Moving Target
  • But There are Rules
  • Under Pressure to Admit It
  • Different Problems in Different States

3. Moisture Problems

  • Searching for a Source
  • Mold Growth in Buildings

4. Wet by Design

PREVENTION THROUGH DESIGN

1. Recommendations for Design
2. Construction Methods Used to Exclude Moisture
3. Tools for Analysis and Design

SOURCES OF WATER

1. Incoming
2. Site Drainage Issues
3. Entrapped Moisture
4. Reasons Why Envelopes Leak

  • Defining a Building Envelope
  • Methods and Materials Meant to Exclude Water
  • Known Problems with Wall Systems
  • Using Envelope Diagnosis to Find Leaks
  • Pen Test
  • Common Reasons for Envelope Failure

WATER AND BUILDING COMPONENTS

1. Buildings from Wood
2. Thinking Through Building Components

  • Structural Framing Design
  • Foundation Design
  • Foundation Leaks
  • Wall Envelope Design
  • Design of Interior Finishes
  • Glazing System Design
  • 4.2.7 Roof Design

3. Moisture from Plumbing Leaks
4. Moisture from HVAC Systems
5. Moisture from Ventilation Systems
6. Moisture from Condensation

  • Causes of Condensation
  • Cold Weather Condensation
  • Hot Weather Condensation

7. Tightening the Envelope
8. Vapor and Air Retarders
9. Combatting Negative Air Pressure

PRECLUDE INFILTRATION PROBLEMS BY DESIGN

1. Preventing Leaks by Planning

  • Moisture Control Design Principles
  • Designing Components to Prevent Leaks

2. Controlling Moisture During Construction

CONCLUSION


Ethics and Morality in the Professional Setting
2HR CE


THIS COURSE MUST BE COMPLETED BY ALL MINNESOTA AND NEBRASKA ARCHITECTS

Course Description

Having a reputation for straight forward business practices can only help your business.  In the current environment of corporate malfeasance, customers will welcome and value a company that promotes a culture of trust and respect.  What should potential customers know about your company?  Is reliable customer service and forthright dialogue of value to you as an owner? This two hour video course will provide an overview of ethical theory and application that will help you establish and maintain hard earned business relationships.

After completing this course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the fundamental theories of ethics and their respective weaknesses.
  • Describe how to effectively apply a Code of Ethics to the current policies, rules and guidelines governing an organization that will ultimately serve the needs of the customer.
  • Summarize the components of a well designed Code of Conduct, including standards, obligations and consequences for non-compliance.
  • Create a Code of Conduct that embodies the ethics that accurately reflect the company core values and principles.

Lesson 1

  • Ethics vs. Morals
  • Social Norms
  • Ethics, Values, and Your Business

Lesson 2

  • Stakeholders
  • Introduction to Ethical Theory – (Duty, Consequence, and Virtue)
  • Duty Based Ethics

Lesson 3

  • Consequence Based Ethics
  • Virtue Based Ethics

Lesson 4

  • Basic Code of Ethics / Code of Conduct

Lesson 5

  • Simplified Code of Ethics
  • Comprehensive Code of Ethics

Lesson 6

  • Comprehensive Code of Ethics (cont.)

  • Credit(s) earned on completion of this course will be reported to AIA CES for AIA members.  Certificates of Completion for both AIA members and non-AIA members are available to print upon completion of the course.
  • This course is registered with AIA CES for continuing professional education.  As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA or any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product.
  • Course instructors will be available by email at info@onlinecti.com, or telephone (800-727-7104) between 9am and 5pm Eastern Standard Time. They will assist you with questions regarding course content.
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